Trades and Trends: October 2, 2021

Join Altan Insights as we highlight trading activity across the various alternative marketplaces with a combination of charts and penned analysis to help investors track trends and price movements that impact their portfolio. This week we review September trading performance across Rally, Collectable, and Otis.

Rally

After August brought record returns on Rally, September continued the trend with another month of impressive performance. The average return in September dripped slightly month over month, with a 23.12% average versus the August return of 32.11%. Eleven different assets gained at least 50% in September while only 8 assets gained that amount or more in August. 

You might experience déjà vu when reviewing returns by asset class over the last two months as the top three performing sectors during August finished in the exact same order this month. Video games led in September, closing 132.04% higher on average after the sector returned 214.3% in August. Comic books climbed 86.48% on average in September- a strong gain versus their August return of 54.24%. Card games were the third best-performing asset class for the second consecutive month as the sector jumped 51.55% in September. The September return was a slight increase compared to performance in August when the asset class gained 49.25% on average. 

The 1964 Marvel Amazing Spider-Man #10 was the best-performing asset on Rally in September with a 202.5% gain. Both the N64 GoldenEye and the 1987 NES Mike Tyson’s PUNCH-OUT!! more than doubled their market caps with gains of 175.63% and 158% respectively. Jack Kerouac’s ‘On the Road’ climbed 68.09% to lead all books while the 1955 Roberto Clemente Rookie Card moved 55.56% higher to lead sports cards. Books and sports cards closed as the fourth and fifth best-performing asset classes with respective returns of 20.01% and 19.41%.

The worst-performing asset this month on Rally was the Hermès 20CM Sellier Faubourg Birkin which slipped -13.82%. Three Hermès Birkin bags closed among the seven worst-performing assets in August as the 35CM Crocodile fell -10.87% and the 20CM Sellier Blue dipped -5.08%. Cars were the only asset class to finish August with a negative average return on Rally as the sector slipped -0.51%. 

Collectable

Note: Only assets that traded for the entire month are included in data calculations and graphs.

The average return on Collectable closed in double-digits for the second consecutive month. The platform returned 10.27% on average which represents a slight drop from the 19.33% return in August. There were 93 different assets that traded the entire month on Collectable and the platform now has over 100 assets trading daily heading into October. 

The 1960 Topps Willie Mays Card climbed 114.29% to close September as the best-performing asset while the 1954 Wilt Chamberlain High School Uniform gained 96.08% to finish second. Quarterback Josh Allen has cemented himself as an MVP contender for the second consecutive season and his 2018 Gold Refractor jumped 80.75% in the first month of the 2021 NFL season. Tiger Woods 1990s putter was the best-performing asset on Collectable in August and the fractional golf club continued its positive upswing with a 72.84% gain in September. The second Wilt Chamberlain game-worn IPO also performed well enough to garner inclusion on the top-ten list as Wilt’s Rookie Uniform climbed 71.88%.

Sports memorabilia outperformed sports cards in September as memorabilia gained 17.96% versus the 8.16% average obtained by cardboard. In total, 73 of the 93 assets traded on Collectable were sports cards while the remaining 22% were sports memorabilia. Boxing climbed 54.34% carried by Muhammad Ali’s WBC Title Belt while golf closed 33.31% higher, Baseball finished September with an average return of 10.02% while basketball and football gained 9.72%, and 3.24% respectively. Soccer was the only sport to finish September in the red on Collectable as the world’s game dropped -7.38% on average.

Emmitt Smith’s MVP Trophies were the worst-performing asset with a -40% return. The 2005 Sign of the Times card dropped -29.9% while Ozzie Smith’s 1979 Topps Rookie Card tumbled -21.05%. 

Otis

Note: Only assets that trade for the entire month are included in data calculations and graphs.

The average return on Otis dipped slightly month over month as the platform gained 5.25% compared to the 9.05% average return in August. In total, 99 different assets traded the entire month on Otis- up from 89 assets last month. Similar to Rally, Video games were the best-performing asset class as the sector soared to a 50.01% average return. In August, video games were the best-performing sector that was represented by more than one asset as the space gained 26.23%. 

Three different assets gained triple-digits in September as the NES Mike Tyson’s PUNCH-OUT!! climbed 400% followed by the NES Tetris Collection and Dior x Air Jordan 1 Lows which added 125.52% and 100% to their market caps respectively. The 2012 National Treasures Russell Wilson Rookie Card was the best-performing sports card with a 67.65% return and Katherine Bernhardt’s ‘Sneakers, Computers, Capri Sun’ led all art with a 53.7% gain. 

The Tomb of Dracula #10 was the worst-performing asset in September with a loss of -73.33%. Modern basketball cards tumbled as the 2003 SP Michael Jordan Gold dropped -43.67% while the Kawhi Leonard RPA fell -42.86%. Four of the five sports cards that closed September among the ten worst-performing assets were basketball cards. Overall, the sports card sector slipped -7.8% while sports memorabilia gained 3.81%. NFTs were the worst-performing assets as the sector fell -16.46% on average. The asset class is still up 587.5% overall as CryptoPunk #543 has gained 900% since IPO but fell -33% in September.


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