Trades and Trends: July Review

Join Altan Insights as we highlight trading activity across the various alternative marketplaces with a combination of charts and penned analysis to help investors track trends and price movements that impact their portfolio. This month we review secondary market performance for the month of July.

Rally

Rally returned an impressive 13.2% on average in June with 10 different assets gaining at least 50%. For the second straight month, the best-performing asset was a video game as 1998 Playstation Grand Theft Auto gained 106.33%. In June, the 1997 N64 GoldenEye returned 60% to lead on the platform. For reference, that 60% gain which was the highest last month, would have been the 9th best return in July on Rally. 

Video games were the best-performing asset on average, adding 60.55% while memorabilia and comic books followed, returning 43.62% and 34.69% respectively. Video games were also the best performing asset class on Rally in June as the sector gained 22.88% during that month. That return would have only been good enough for fifth among all asset classes on Rally in July. All ten asset classes that traded this month on Rally closed positively on average but sports memorabilia lagged gaining 0.35%. Sports cards and card games rounded out the three worst-performing sectors, gaining 1.79% and 2.15%. There were 12 different sports cards that traded on Rally in July, giving the asset class the title for most traded. Cars finished the month with 11 different assets and card games closed in third with 7 traded offerings. In total, 56 different assets traded on Rally and 10 fell at least 15% during their trading sessions. The 1994 Michael Jordan Baseball Cleats dropped -34.12% while the 1999 Pokémon Charizard Holo Card slipped -30%. Kobe Bryant-related assets struggled on Rally as the 1996 Topps Finest Refractor Kobe Bryant Rookie Card cut its market cap by -27.27% and the 2016 Farewell Court lost -23.75%. July marked the second straight month that non-sports assets turned-in the best performance with the top five performing assets all representing sectors that are not related to sports. 

Collectable

Note: Only assets that traded for the entire month are included in data calculations and graphs.

After a rough June in which the average return on Collectable was -12.21%, the platform recovered to close July with a 9.74% average. In June, the best performing asset, a 1952 Bowman Mickey Mantle, gained 25.77%. In July, ten different assets gained at least 34%. Sports memorabilia starred on the platform as three of the top four best-performing assets came from the sector. Emmitt Smith’s MVP Trophies gained 100% while the 1994 Michael Jordan Signed Bat climbed 79.8% and Tiger Woods’ Tournament-Used Putter added 50%. 

Golf was carried primarily by the Tiger Woods putter as the sport gained 18.23% to lead all other sports on Collectable. Another 1952 Mickey Mantle card finished in the top-10 this month but this time it was the Topps version of the Yankee legends’ rookie card. The Mantle rose 49.12% after another example carrying the same PSA 8 grade sold for $2.1 million on July 10th. The Collectable copy closed the month of July with a $1.03 million market cap. Wrestling was the worst-performing sport, falling -14.23% on average while hockey slipped -9.31%. Sports memorabilia continued to outperform sports cards on Collectable as the sector returned 20.25% versus the 6.30% average produced by cards. In June, sports cards returned an average of -13.21% while sports memorabilia dropped -9.30%. Andre the Giant’s Game-Used Jockstrap was the worst-performing asset- tumbling -38.46%. Modern hockey struggled as the Sidney Crosby basket and Alexander Ovechkin card fell -31.25% and -16.67% respectively.

Otis

Note: Only assets that traded for the entire month are included in data calculations and graphs.Assets that were suspended from trading due to new trading processes are included. 

Losses were limited during July on the Otis trading floor as the platform returned an average of 9.07%. Only two assets dropped more than -10% during the month while 10 different assets gained at least 26%. The Original Apple iPhone gained 90% in its first month of trading while the Air Jordan 1 Modern Classics gained 87.19% to finish runner-up. Three different Air Jordan-related assets closed July among the top ten best-performing assets as the 1985 AJ1 Collection II jumped 35.14% and the five pairs of AJ1’s added 32.87%. 

Mario had a strong July on Otis as Super Mario Bros. 3 gained 86.57% and the original Super Mario Bros. climbed 49.92%. Memorabilia was the best-performing asset class on Otis as the iPhone is the only asset that represents the sector but six different classes returned positive months. Video games and comic books gained 15.44% and 15.18% on average respectively while sneakers followed with a 9.99% average return. 

The Michael Jordan Player Exclusive “TYPS” AJ1’s dropped -33.49% in July after gaining 80.59% in June. Kobe Bryant assets also struggled on Otis as the 1996 Bowman Best Atomic Refractor dropped -13.79%. Sports memorabilia was the worst-performing asset class with an average return of -10.72%. The asset class had been the best-performing in June when it returned 22.04%. Luxury was the worst-performing asset class on Otis in June but fell flat in July returning 0%. Out of 88 total assets that traded in July, 28 were sports cards while art and sneakers were each represented by 16 assets.

Assets trading on Collectable had the highest average market cap at $110,680 while assets on Rally averaged a value of $105,863. The average price per share of assets that traded on Rally was $24.33- the highest of the three platforms- while the average price on Otis was $21.58. Collectable had the lowest price per share with an average cost of $12.


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