Trades and Trends by Altan Insights: May 29, 2021

Altan Insights tracks 11 different asset classes across the various alternative investing marketplaces. The below analysis on the top-performing sectors uses data through May 27th. 



Video games are the best performing asset class, returning 48.56% on average. The Super Mario Bros. series has been the bellwether of the sector, with Super Mario Bros. 3 returning 650% on Otis while the first edition game is up 360% on Rally and 62.5% on Otis. The worst performing video games include NES Ice Climber on Otis which has dropped -49.4% while Grand Theft Auto on Rally is down -37%. 


Out of the 18 video games currently trading, 10 are on Rally while 8 trade on Otis. The Otis games have performed better overall although both marketplaces have provided investors with great returns. Video games on Otis are up 66.25% while Rally games have gained an average of 26.45%. 


The other asset class that has gained over 40% on average is sports cards. Sports cards are the most traded asset across the secondary markets with over 90 different offerings available. Maybe unsurprisingly to collectors, post-war era cardboard has assembled the best performance to date. No player has influenced an era the way Mickey Mantle has defined 1950s sports cards. There are seven different Mantle cards currently trading and the average return is an astonishing 144%. Out of the twelve 1950s cards trading, only the 1951 Gordie Howe has dropped in value, falling -10.6%. Other stars included in 1950s offerings are Bart Starr, Pelé, Ernie Banks, and Roberto Clemente. While baseball has carried the 1950s, basketball, football, and hockey have played their part in the ‘70s and ‘80s. The 1979 O-Pee-Chee Wayne Gretzky card is up 225% on Collectable while the 1972 Topps Julius Erving Rookie Card has gained 70% on Otis. Just as Mantle defined the ‘50s, Jordan has ruled the ‘80s. His Fleer rookie card has gained 220% on Collectable and a 1986 complete set, highlighted by that same card, has added 150% to its valuation on Otis. 

Books are currently only found on Rally but the asset class has traded well overall, gaining an average of 38.21%. The range of publication dates for books on Rally is vast- Shakespeare's ‘Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies’ is the oldest, published in 1685 while JK Rowling’s Harry Potter first appeared on bookshelves in 1997. The market caps within the sector are also widespread, with ‘The Federalist’ priced at $150,000, down to one of Rally’s lowest-priced offerings, a first edition copy of ‘A Boy’s Will’ trading at a $14,600 valuation. The ‘Second World War’ by Winston Churchill has displayed the strongest performance to date, returning 160% on Rally. Two other examples, ‘Animal Farm’ by George Orwell and Philosopher-Scientist by Albert Einstein have also impressed, rising 152% and 103% respectively. 


Comic books have increased 32.29% on average, with Rally and Otis splitting the top four performing assets. Three of the four top returning comic books come from the 1970s, a decade that is often considered a golden era for the sector. Giant Size X-Men has gained 300% since IPO Otis while Rally’s Superman #21 is up 220%. The decade has dominated the space, returning 140.2% on average while the second-best decade, the 1940s, is up 33.12%. Over half the total comic books that have IPO’d were published in the 1960s which has returned 3.35% overall. The best performing comic from that decade is the Fantastic Four #52 which is up 116% on Otis. 


Card games are the 5th best performing asset class, gaining 24.17% on average. The sector is comprised of Pokémon cards and sealed boxes. There are a total of 9 assets trading, four of which are individual cards from Otis. Two individual cards have traded on Rally in addition to two booster boxes and a 1st Edition complete set. The single set has returned 380% from its IPO price and is the only offering from the sector trading positively. The other four Rally Pokémon offerings have dropped at least -20% while the three Otis offerings are also in the red. 



Although cars on Rally have traded relatively flat, up 2.02% on average, early vintages have shined, with the 1950s and ‘60s trading well above average for the asset class. Six cars from the 1960s have traded with an average return of 15.25%. The decade has been carried by consistency- only one vehicle has traded negatively. Meanwhile, four cars from the 2000s have traded and are down -11.08% on average. The 1990s have traded positively, up 5.74%, with much of the gains from that decade courtesy of the 7UP Edition Ford Mustang, which has gained 178.8%, the most of any fractional car to date. Cars from the 1980s have been the second-worst performing, dropping -5.60% on average. Two cars from the ‘80s are down nearly 50%; The Ferrari 512 BBi (50%) and the Lamborghini Countach Turbo (49.6%).


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